DC TRIP DAY 3: WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 29TH / by Rugile Kaladyte

NPR

We began the day at NPR and Emily Bogle, an RIT graduate and Assistant Producer at NPR, led our group through the office until we were asked to gather in a circle for Scrum. Scrum is done everyday and people talk about what they did yesterday and what their plans for today are. I briefly mentioned that I had almost passed out at The White House and my classmates also pitched in with their own highlights from the trip so far. One that stuck with me was a woman who had said she was wrangling bats, but there wasn’t any time for elaboration. We met in the conference room and talked about the projects Planet Money Makes a T-Shirt and Borderland. Borderland featured data as rolling numbers which I thought could be useful for my website and incorporating Lithuania’s suicide rate, 34 of 100,000 people per year. There was a lot of importance played on the visuals and it isn’t the need to be first but rather the need to be thoughtful. Because it isn’t breaking news, NPR has the time for thoughtfulness.

National Geographic

Ken Geiger, the Deputy Director of Photography, showed the class around National Geographic, the place many photojournalists dream of one day contributing to. It’s the magazine that people will keep on their bookshelves for years. “When we are passionate about something, we will put the time and energy into it,” said Geiger. Keith Jenkins, the General Manager of National Geographic Digital, spoke with our class about the digital aspect of the magazine and how they are only a few weeks from making the site more mobile friendly. The YourShot community has received some of the most traffic on the site and is looked at by the photo editors. “There is still a big difference when there’s a professional behind the camera and someone who does it as a hobby,” said Jenkins. Geiger then took us to the basement where we were walked around, draws dropped, among some of the most interesting camera equipment we had seen, much of it modified for various assignments.